The Fremont Podcast

Episode 101: From Maccabees to Menorahs: Hanukkah’s History and Community Traditions

December 08, 2023 Ricky B Season 2 Episode 101
The Fremont Podcast
Episode 101: From Maccabees to Menorahs: Hanukkah’s History and Community Traditions
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever wondered about the rich history and cultural significance of Hanukkah? Interested in the heartwarming community work by Chabad in Fremont? We'll explore the courageous story of the Maccabees, share our family traditions, and shine a light on the importance of Hanukkah - a celebration of light over darkness and the power of standing for what's right.

We then turn our attention to the incredible community-oriented work done by Chabad Fremont. We express our admiration for their inclusive Hanukkah event that welcomes everyone. Listen closely as we dissect the planning, coordination and execution of successful community events - it's more intricate than you might think!

Finally, we share personal Hanukkah experiences and traditions. We reminisce about a grand menorah lighting in Manhattan, we too traverse our memory lanes to dig up our own Hanukkah celebrations. Together, we'll underscore the joy and sense of togetherness that comes with celebrating Hanukkah as a community. So, pull up a chair, grab a latke or a jelly donut, and join us on this enlightening venture through history, community work, and shared traditions.

Check out our new podcast focused on Niles CA called the Cast of Niles. You can find episodes on almost any podcast platform. You can also find it here.

Also, Petrocelli Homes has been a key sponsor for the Fremont Podcast almost from the beginning. If you are looking for help or advice about buying or selling a home, or if you are looking for a realtor, get in touch with Petrocelli Homes on Niles Blvd in Niles.

Additionally, Banter Bookshop is the best little bookshop in Fremont. They are a sponsor of that podcast. And we are excited to have them as a partner.

Intro and Outro voiceovers made by Gary Williams. Check out garywilliams.org.

This episode was edited by Andrew C.

Scheduling and background was done by Sara S.

This is a Muggins Media Podcast.

Speaker 1:

I'm Gary Williams. Your reviews help other people find this podcast. If you would please leave a review on iTunes.

Speaker 2:

We just want to be aware of the ever evolving needs of our community, so we have something for everybody here.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's great. I love it. I think that the way that you just like said all of that in like two breaths is the way that I feel. Whenever I see all the stuff that you guys are doing on social media as well, I feel like I just go like you guys are just doing so many, so many good things. I think that's great.

Speaker 1:

Coming to you straight from Fremont, california. This is the Fremont podcast, dedicated to telling the stories of the past and present of the people and places of the city of Fremont, one conversation at a time.

Speaker 5:

Ricky wanted me to go to this community garden in Irvington on the corner. Well, near the corner of Irvington Avenue and Fremont Boulevard, Downed wind from Ophelia's taco truck, Not a hard sell to get me to come here. It's a wonderful little garden. Stress on little. There's one, two, three, four, five, six planter boxes and something decorative in the center. The sign says welcome garden of plenty, a community garden for enjoyment of all neighbors. No littering and keep it clean. Plant in flower beds. Three and four. Help your garden thrive all year. It was made this year, August 2023, by an Eagle Scout named Mariam Nasir. This is lovely and I sincerely hope the community keeps it going. This is episode 101 of the Fremont podcast.

Speaker 1:

Now here's your host, Ricky B.

Speaker 3:

Very good. Well, I'm excited to have you guys on the podcast. I have Kaya. Make sure I get that right.

Speaker 2:

You got it. You got it, don't worry.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I had you guys on here over a year ago and we talked about Passover and I'm just so grateful that you guys took the time to be able to share that with us, to be able to share on the podcast. But we're approaching Hanukkah and you guys have a big event happening here in the city about Hanukkah, so we're going to talk about that. So, first of all, how are you guys doing right now? Are you guys doing all right? We're doing wonderful.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you know we're great, we're busy, we're hustling and we're great.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. So let's talk about you know. Let's start with what is Hanukkah. So part of the reason we did the whole talk on Passover was because people who are not part of a particular community, a religious community, they oftentimes will see maybe certain traditions or festivals or whatever taking place and they just, you know, they understand, maybe from a distance, what it might be, but they still don't know. And so we wanted to talk about Passover, and I would love to be able to do the same thing with Hanukkah, because I think Hanukkah seems to be a beautiful holiday and I think for people to understand that and know what it is that is being observed, I think it's helpful. So, kaya, share with me what is Hanukkah.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So Hanukkah is an eight day holiday which celebrates the victory of light over darkness and of the year. Around 164 BCE, the Greek Empire took over Jerusalem and began Hellenizing the Jewish people, telling them that they needed to assimilate into Greek culture and stop being their own people and have their own religion. Many people did, many people made that choice. The rules were enforced, with a lot of cruelty, a lot of death, a lot of killing, and there was a group of brave people called the Makhabis who stood up and said no, we are done. We're going to stand up, even though we're very few. We're going to fight with everything we've got. They made a little army and they fought back against the Greeks and after many, many hard wars, they miraculously won. So that's miracle number one.

Speaker 3:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

Then they came to the temple, which was a total mess, and they wanted to light the menorah, which is a symbol of light and freedom and just beauty. And they so badly wanted to light the menorah but they couldn't find any non-contaminated oils. They searched and they searched and they searched. They found one tiny little bottle which should have lasted from one day but miraculously lasted for eight days. So Hanukkah is celebrated by lighting the menorah for eight days and by eating foods that are oily, and it's just a super fun holiday and I think the message is something we can all connect to. You know, the just light prevailing darkness, having the faith and the optimism to light the menorah. Even though they didn't have enough oil, they were like we're going to still light it and the concept that standing up for us right is sometimes challenging, but it's always worth it.

Speaker 3:

Wow, that's a significant thing to be able to observe and reflect on. I think that's one of the things that I've really appreciated about the Jewish community is how seriously, how depth the celebrations and the certain holy days that you guys have, that you guys observe, how significant they are to both your history and tying in the history into your current circumstances in life and whatever they might be. So what is Hanukkah going to look like here then? That's a great Understand or explanation of where it came from. What does it look like here for you guys?

Speaker 6:

so, first of all, for our family, we light the menorah every evening, starting Thursday night, and the first night of Hanukkah, thursday night, will light the first candle, and so on through the all the eight nights, adding one candle each night. So our family gets together and it's a really special time where we pause and we light the candles, we play dreidel, we have Jelly donuts and latkes and our kids really like getting Cold, maybe called Hanukkah gelt, which is where we give our children some money for the holiday or a gift. Some people also have traditions of giving gifts throughout the holiday and the kids find it really special to spend family time together, okay, throughout the week, especially in the evenings as it starts getting dark. That's what we like. The menorah, yeah, as well as in the community. So, sharing the holidays, celebrating, whether it's in senior homes or it's ensuring that if there's anybody in the community who needs who, let's say, to feel connected or to sell it, needs physically, needs candles or needs a resource to find the menorah, and we're there to provide that, as well as Connecting people within the community to celebrate together, or someone may feel that they're celebrating alone we can celebrate together. And then, of course, we have the large menorah celebration lighting which will be in downtown Fremont at the Sunday, and there's Sunday evening at 4 30. Okay, and there we have a large menorah and Lots of activities and crafts. The most important thing is that it's an opportunity for people to get together and to celebrate the theme of Hanukkah. That's great.

Speaker 3:

That's great. Now you mentioned jelly donuts. You also mentioned Oily foods, like what are some of the other foods, or what are some of the other Maybe some of the other treats that you guys look forward to each year when it comes to the type of Foods that you might partake in okay.

Speaker 2:

So it's not a diet holiday, it's just not it. There are other holidays, you know. You know, passover is pretty good, but Hanukkah is not it. So, because the miracle happened with oil, we eat donuts fried in oil, that's just the custom, and we potato lockers fried in oil. Okay they're really fun and really delicious and in America I never grew up like this, but everyone eats them with applesauce and sour cream. That's an American custom and they're just delicious. And we will have lockers and donuts on Sunday for everybody, completely free. This is just we just love sharing this Light with everybody and it brings us so much joy when we see different people On such a diverse crowd coming to the Hanukkah event and just celebrating together. I have so many dear friends that I've met that night, you know, over the years, and People who are like show me their pictures. Here we are, with this manure and that manure, because we always do something different and it's it's just really special to see everyone coming together and we're so grateful to the city of Fremont for always just helping us out, making it so comfortable, so easy for us. They're so accepting of our culture and we really just are so deeply grateful for that.

Speaker 6:

Yeah, that's great. There's also the famous dredel game, okay, which stemmed from the story of Hanukkah, okay, when the Jewish community were prohibited from studying their traditions. So they would be hiding out and they would be studying, and if Any of the soldiers would show up and they would be found studying their traditions, then it was very dangerous. So they would. What they would do is they would hide or whatever they were studying, and they would pull out this dredel game and they would like be playing dredel.

Speaker 1:

Huh.

Speaker 6:

So because of that, there's the famous dredel game, where it's like a top like us, we spin it. Yeah and there's four different letters on it and usually you play with multiple people. There's coins in the middle and everyone has their you know their little stash and Uh-huh. Some with one letter you have to put. If you have a shin, you have to put in a coin, or you have to take a coin, or you know a neutral. So so that's the famous Hanukkah dredel game. And there's also, instead of using real coins, there's chocolate coins. Oh, so that's a really fun part for children where they get the chocolate coins and they use that to play with the dredel.

Speaker 2:

That's awesome. We'll make sure to send you home with some chocolate. That's great. It will be someone you are yeah that'd be awesome, that'd be great.

Speaker 3:

I love it. This is really cool. So, just thinking about you mentioned, you're grateful to the city of freeman for always being, you know, making, helping, helping with whatever you guys are doing, and I think that there is a huge thanks the other direction as well. Not that I'm representing the city of freeman, but I feel like when I first met you guys, when we did the Passover interview, that I didn't know much about you or what you were doing, and then I think that over the last year and a half, like we, our relationship has grown quite a bit. We've crossed paths a number of times and All I see from you guys is that you serve the community so well and that it's not just like exclusively to your, the, the Jewish community, but that you're very welcoming to Anybody and everybody who will join in with what you're doing, and I I think that that is a significant thing. Like when I think of a and and we'll speak more broadly and legally but when I think of a nonprofit that's actually helping to benefit our community in a huge way, I think of you guys and I think of the, the work that you guys are doing just to help create a safe place and a Sense of joy within our community, and I think that's. I think that's wonderful, and so I think I think you guys should be Recognized for the work that you're doing in the community as well. I think it's, I think it's wonderful.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, we really appreciate it. I just want to add something. Yeah, it's really not you guys like my shame I. First of all, we have an incredible team here at Chabad and it's very much the people who have become a part of the community. You know, hanukkah is not organized by my shame myself. There's a committee of the community and all the stuff that is in place. You know by now it's it's become so much easier to plan it because over the years so many people have worked hard in it. We have local businesses sponsoring the event. We have people in the community volunteering. This year the Boy Scouts are going to be volunteering and I just think there's so many people who have joined this movement of positivity and light and there's no way this could have happened from me and my sheet. We, thank God, been blessed from above and we've really been blessed by the people who are a part of everything that happens here.

Speaker 3:

That's great. That's great, we'll be right back. You can hear the rest of this conversation in just a moment.

Speaker 5:

The Eloni College flea market is happening every second Saturday of the month, that's tomorrow, december 9th. If you're listening to this on Friday, when we release this episode, it's also January 13th and February 10th. The flea market is happening on Eloni's Fremont campus from 9 am to 3 pm. And look, I'll be honest, even if you go and you don't find anything, this podcast is about community. I promise you will find it there. We go to thrift stores and flea markets and it's just interesting to see what's out there and you never know what you'll find Treasures.

Speaker 2:

The Eloni flea market. They were really responsive. We had only even decided that we wanted to do this a few days ago, and we called them, and they were totally encouraging about it too.

Speaker 3:

We really are having fun Because our kids are going to play right here, so we're just going to go check it out.

Speaker 2:

So we decided we're like, oh, let's go check out the flea market.

Speaker 4:

I've had a lot of people come by expressing interest and it's a nice opportunity because you have a wide audience than you would if you're just doing it in your front yard. Have you seen anything?

Speaker 3:

Things pop out, but you got to walk the whole flea market before you pull the trigger on anything. I collect too much stuff at home and so we thought we should cut back on some stuff, get rid of some stuff, so we can go back out and buy more stuff.

Speaker 4:

And actually we're doing really well. Today I seek out the garage sale vendors because they always have just a collection of wonderful, unusual and there really is something for everyone.

Speaker 5:

So as a shopper and a vendor, it works both ways.

Speaker 4:

Yes, mostly for me as a shopper.

Speaker 3:

And now back to our conversation. What is the I know what you were saying that you do as a for your family for Hanukkah, and then you kind of talked about the things to expect at the Hanukkah event. What does all the preparation look like for you guys in what you're doing, like what? I guess it was kind of understood that there was a committee involved, but still it's still a lot of work. One way or the other there's a lot of work for you guys. What is all involved with what you guys are doing in preparing for this time with the community?

Speaker 2:

Okay. So there's, of course, all the vendors. I can share my whiteboard. Thank God it's actually about 75% rubbed off, which I'm very happy. So first of all, there's a waging all the vendors. There's ordering all the supplies. There's organizing all the supplies. There's planning your main features of the event. That was the first step we started in the summer planning. There's the permitting. There's working with the city, making sure that everyone is invited, the marketing, all of that. It's just a big operation and then, on the day of the event, there's and security Security of the course and we're so grateful to the Fremont BD we just spoke to the Chief this morning and he's fully, amazingly, on board and committed. And then, have you ever heard of the word schlep?

Speaker 3:

I think I've probably heard it. I may have even used it, but I probably never used it in a way that it was meant to be used, so I don't know. Yes, so what is a schlep?

Speaker 2:

So if you want to see schleping, you should just come by.

Speaker 3:

Okay.

Speaker 2:

The plaza a little early, okay, like we schlep everything Boxes and boxes of supplies and set everything up, and then we clean it perfectly because we want to make sure that we leave it even more beautifully than we received it, and then we schlep everything back into our cars and then we unload everything from our cars. So there's just a lot of schlepping involved on the day.

Speaker 3:

I think I've used it to call somebody a schlep, and I don't even know that that would be totally appropriate.

Speaker 6:

Yeah, it's a very broad word.

Speaker 3:

That's awesome. That's awesome. Well, I love it. I think it's great. I'm going to. I already told you at a time that it's been on my calendar, but I'm going to have to figure out how it's going to work logistically for me and my family to be able to make it. But we would love to come on down for that. So, yeah, so this is. This episode will be going out on Friday. Only gives it like a day and a half notice before everything is going, but we'll try to push it a little bit more for you guys. But so people can expect to come in at 430 and just be able to enjoy with all Enjoy, all the things that you guys have planned to put together for the community. And Beautiful. That's great. That's great. So I want to talk a little bit, too, about the cabade here, because you guys have a lot that goes on here and I know that we may have covered some of that back a year and a half ago, but what are some of the things that you have going on now? What are some of the things that, if people are curious about, you've got some great construction work that's been done on the front here. You beautified the building quite a bit from the outside. What are some of the things that are taking place here that you guys are doing to serve the community regularly?

Speaker 2:

Okay, so there's, there's a lot of things going on. Um, you know, there's a lot of just fun programs. We really are really trying to bring the joy back into life. Um, so we do everything with a huge sense of joy, joy into the oil, the joy into the oil. Yes, we don't want you wish life um to be an oil.

Speaker 4:

We really want it to be a joy.

Speaker 2:

That's good. So well that that's a good one. Okay. So there's a. There's a lot of educational programings. There's a lot of just for fun programings, like sometimes we do restaurant nights and art nights and stuff like that. Um, there's always programs around the Jewish holidays, really fun parties. Um, there's a lot of classes for people who are interested in learning more. Um, there's also youth programming, so there's a summer camp. Um, you know, there's now a preschool, a beautiful preschool. It's connected to Chabad Shalom preschool and run by Shayna and Ellie, who I think you may have met Not sure. Yeah, so they're incredible and that's great. Yeah, they're completely do that in an amazing way. And then we do teen programming, which is really important, and now our next project that we really want to work on it was really supposed to happen right after the high holidays but things just got a little off track Um is we really want to work in our senior programming. You know, we've been here for 11 years now and so many of my dear friends who used to babysit my children and told me how to be a mom and told me how to cook and told me how to do everything, are now getting older and I want to sort of take care of them now, and some of them have retired and have more time so want to volunteer, or some of them are actually just getting older and it's hard for them to come to events at night. So our next project is to work on more senior programming specifically just for seniors even though there are a lot of seniors who really love to come to the other programs but this is going to be something specifically just for seniors. It's going to. We're putting together a committee of seniors who are going to be giving their input, helping plan and um. We're really excited about that because we believe that everyone needs to be treated with respect and valued, and we just want to be aware of the ever evolving needs of our community. So we have something for everybody here.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's great. I love it. I think that the way that you just like said all of that in like two breaths is the way that I feel. Whenever I see all the stuff that you guys are doing on social media as well, I feel like I just go. You guys are just doing so many, so many good things. I think that's great, thank you.

Speaker 2:

You're doing great work. We are your biggest fans. You know that right. I do know that I do that.

Speaker 3:

You guys have encouraged me quite a bit and I appreciate that so much. If people want to be involved in what you're doing, like what are some of the ways that they could volunteer or be a part of what you're doing?

Speaker 2:

So you can always volunteer. There's many things to do and we're actually that's another thing we're working on is streamlining that. You know we're going to have set days of about to volunteer. So there's volunteering with the youth programming, there's volunteering with just getting ready for events. If anyone has a talent, we encourage them to just get in touch with us. Best thing is to just message me, text me, email me, reach out to me in social media. Let me know if you want to be involved. There's always ways to volunteer. We're very, very, very much. Our volunteers run this place. I mean, on Sunday mornings when we have our Hebrew school, I would say that our teenagers are basically running it.

Speaker 6:

Wow.

Speaker 2:

And they tell me what to do. I mean. I think there's 10 of them who come Sunday mornings and you know we have three up in the art studio running the art room. We have a few in the kitchen who are working on like other stuff and they're just, and then my shin and I just have to teach when they do incredible work. So we really love this place to feel like it's a community space, not just a space run by the leadership, but really a space run by the community. So we always love more volunteers and that's great.

Speaker 3:

Anyone wants to get involved.

Speaker 2:

We're open to everyone.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's great. What is the next big event after Hanukkah? Like, what do you have? I know that when you're in the middle of the fog of planning a big event like this, you kind of don't think about the next big thing often. But what's the next big thing that you guys have?

Speaker 6:

So, first of all, the next holiday is Purim, which is in a few months from now, but actually on Hanukkah. So we have tonight, we have a women's event where women get to connect and they're doing art menorah, precisely, it's called Resin Minora and they decorate and, but over more than that even, it's opportunity for women to get together and feel, you know, connected and support one another, and that's a very special event that we have. That's great. And then we have another event next week as well. So throughout Hanukkah there's multiple events. Okay, I would say so.

Speaker 3:

So it's not just this one time, like city event, like you've got a lot of other things that are intertwined with it all.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, Sunday is like the highlight event and then there's a lot more activities happening in Hanukkah. And if you can't make it Sunday, on Thursday there's also going to be a Hanukkah and Union City outside the city hold there.

Speaker 6:

By the.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, we'll give you the details for yourself. We put the yeah, organized by Rabbi Ely and Shayna, and that's going to be like a Hanukkah closing ceremony.

Speaker 3:

Okay, very cool, very good. It's that time of year again when everyone starts getting sniffles and sneezes and coughs. Well, howler's Pharmacy is here to help. They have been in our community for decades, so whether it's a seasonal issue or whether it's something that you have to take care of regularly, howler's Pharmacy is here to help you find exactly what you need. Check them out on the corner of Fremont and Peralta in downtown Centerville. Billy Roy's Burgers in Centerville is a great place to enjoy family food and great service. You can find them off the corner of Thornton Avenue and Fremont Boulevard in Centerville. If you are looking to buy or sell your home, look no further than Petracelli Homes. You can find out more about them at PetracelliHomescom or pay Jennifer a visit in downtown Niles. Milk and Honey Cafe is a family-owned restaurant located at 342-65 Fremont Boulevard. To find out more about the best family-friendly Taiwanese restaurant in Fremont, go to milkandhoneycafecom or check them out on their Facebook page and Instagram. Gembee Electric exists to empower your production. If you're a business owner, you know there's nothing that you want more than to focus on what you do best, so that you can grow your business. Don't let electrical problems or projects stop you from your greatest production. Call GemBee Electric and let them help you empower your production today.

Speaker 6:

The message of Hanukkah is so timely that number one just from the practical procedure of light in the menorah, where the first night of Hanukkah we light one and then each night we add one more candle, represents the idea of increasing in light and especially today we can all add in more light. We can all you know. It may be natural to some to you know what's going on and what's happening and just perhaps be bogged down by the nuances or troubles or challenges that maybe, whether it's personal or in the world as a whole, but the truth is that the way that we can really propel the world further and our community further and ourselves further is really by increasing, in that light and by creating that, those positive thoughts and actions to ourselves, to our families and to our loved ones, people around us. That's really what makes that change and makes the world a better place and that's really a highlight message of Hanukkah. That's cool.

Speaker 3:

Do you have a special memory of Hanukkah? That was really like significant. That stands out to you, sure.

Speaker 6:

So, besides for the memories growing up and lighting the menorah in our with our family, I remember once my sister and I went to Manhattan and to see a cousin of ours and when we were there it was during Hanukkah and they have a really large menorah lighting there with many, many, many people and a huge giant menorah.

Speaker 4:

like they need a like this truck to be able to get up to the top of the menorah and light the menorah.

Speaker 6:

And for me it was just really memorable to celebrate with many people together and had the like the impact of celebrating together with many, not just in our home, but also there's something special about celebrating with the community and that was like probably the largest menorah lighting I've been to, and with thousands and thousands and thousands of people and someone up on a crane to be able to light the menorah.

Speaker 4:

So that was like just a fun experience as a little child.

Speaker 6:

I always remember that menorah lighting. That's cool.

Speaker 3:

Kyah, do you have a particular memory?

Speaker 2:

I'm trying to sort through my memories as I'm listening to my sister speak. I'll say what sticks out to me the most is being a little girl and I grew up in England. The jelly doughnuts there they cover them in granulated sugar, not powdered sugar, and I just remember being at the downtown menorah lighting with this huge menorah and me and my friends just downing those donuts. It was so much fun. And my mom being like no, no, please, not so many won't be just downing them. And I have to say that, celebrating Hanukkah and Fremont our first Hanukkah lighting, there was so much to get through to make it happen and we just had a baby, I think our baby, so she was born in October, this was December. I think. She was like six weeks old and I remember we showed up and we're like what if no one comes? I mean, we put so much work and so much money and it was that Pacific Commons and the management were so lovely about doing it, but we were like what if no one shows up tonight? And then we watched people just coming and coming, and coming and it was, it was the most crazy, incredible thing and we were like pinching ourselves and the whole time I'm like where did all these people come from?

Speaker 6:

Like how did they?

Speaker 2:

even know, and that like is just magical Watching our community come together to celebrate Hanukkah there's no feeling like it. It's so special yeah.

Speaker 3:

That's cool, that's really cool. Yeah, I can imagine like especially doing something for the first time like that. And I mean my wife we just mentioned that you have had a baby since we've had her last interview. I've had a baby since our last interview and you can kind of get into the fog you know the mom fog brain as well Like so I can imagine dealing, you know, with all that as well as trying to prepare for this, and then just like I just this could just like just be a bust and no one comes, and then also everyone's there and that's cool, that's really cool. Well, very good. I hope that this is an exciting event for our community. I hope it brings encouragement and light and enjoy in areas that desperately need it, because I think that that's. I think that's what we need. I think we, everyone in our community, needs that you know, and so I hope that that's helpful for us, and I appreciate what you guys are doing in our community just on a weekly and daily basis. I think it's a wonderful thing. So for you, it's not a one time event where you just do this. It's something that you guys I believe that you guys live it out, so that's really great.

Speaker 6:

Thank you so much. Yeah, yeah, that's really kind of you.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 6:

Absolutely, and you thank you for the work that you're doing in the community. Yeah, I continue to bring people together. Yeah, because that's really what we can continue doing in our community.

Speaker 3:

Well, thanks for saying that I do. I do hope that that's what we're. We can all do together. I hope that we can accomplish this in a communal way.

Speaker 6:

We do have an amazing community. I agree A really beautiful community, yeah, and so many people that love doing good things in our community, that's right.

Speaker 3:

Well, thank you guys for being on the podcast again and I hope everything goes well with Har.

Speaker 2:

It's our pleasure. It was so fun. It's great to hang out. Happy Hanukkah, yeah.

Speaker 6:

Happy Hanukkah, thank you, thank you.

Speaker 1:

This episode was hosted and produced by Ricky B, scheduling and pre-interviews by Sarah S. Rachel Prey is the print editor in charge of our newsletter. I'm Gary Williams. Andrew Kovett is the editor. Music provided by soundstripecom Be sure to subscribe wherever it is that you listen so you don't miss an episode. You can find everything we make the podcast, our newsletter and all of our social media links at thefremontpodcastcom. Join us next week on the Fremont Podcast.

Speaker 3:

This is a Muggins Media podcast.

Celebrating Hanukkah in Fremont
Appreciating Chabad's Community Work
Community Events and Volunteer Opportunities
Celebrating Hanukkah in the Community